"We only put it there
To give warning of something we dare not
Ignore, lest we should come upon it
Too suddenly, recognise it too late,
As our cries were swallowed up and all hands lost.”
W. S. Merwin
The Fog-horns on our homepage
The large black fog-horns that can be seen in front of the lighthouse were installed at The Lizard in 1878. Because they were the last compressed air fog signal in Britain to be discontinued, there workings are still functional and are sounded on special occasions. During thick and foggy weather, one blast will be sounded every five minutes. This was later changed to two blasts (high, low) every two minutes, later altered again on October 8th, 1908, to two blasts (long blast; short blast) in succession every minute.

Audible fog signals have been used in one form or another for many hundreds of years. In their infancy bells or gongs were struck manually, following that small cannons fired at regular intervals were sometimes used to warn away ships. You can imagine how impractical this became when fog conditions persisted over several days!

Most fog-horns of this type use a vibrating column of air to create an audible tone, but the method of setting up this vibration differs. Some horns, like the Daboll trumpet, used vibrating plates or metal reeds, a similar principle to a modern electric car horn. Others utilised air forced through holes in a revolving cylinder or disk, in the same manner as a siren.  Some later fog bells were placed under water, particularly in especially dangerous areas, so that their sound would be carried further and reverberate through the ship’s hull.

At the turn of the century, experiments to develop more effective fog-horns were carried out by John Tyndall and Lord Rayleigh, amongst others. Lord Rayleigh’s ongoing research for Trinity House culminated in a siren with a large trumpet designed to achieve maximum sound propagation.

As two Signalman owners can attest, to sleep in The Lizard youth hostel pre ‘98 when the fog-horns sound will result in a sleepless night. Now with the sophisticated electronic siren (100 dB with a range of 4 miles) all you can hear is a gentle peep.

"We only put it there

To give warning of something we dare not

Ignore, lest we should come upon it

Too suddenly, recognise it too late,

As our cries were swallowed up and all hands lost.”

W. S. Merwin

The Fog-horns on our homepage

The large black fog-horns that can be seen in front of the lighthouse were installed at The Lizard in 1878. Because they were the last compressed air fog signal in Britain to be discontinued, there workings are still functional and are sounded on special occasions. During thick and foggy weather, one blast will be sounded every five minutes. This was later changed to two blasts (high, low) every two minutes, later altered again on October 8th, 1908, to two blasts (long blast; short blast) in succession every minute.
Audible fog signals have been used in one form or another for many hundreds of years. In their infancy bells or gongs were struck manually, following that small cannons fired at regular intervals were sometimes used to warn away ships. You can imagine how impractical this became when fog conditions persisted over several days!
Most fog-horns of this type use a vibrating column of air to create an audible tone, but the method of setting up this vibration differs. Some horns, like the Daboll trumpet, used vibrating plates or metal reeds, a similar principle to a modern electric car horn. Others utilised air forced through holes in a revolving cylinder or disk, in the same manner as a siren.  Some later fog bells were placed under water, particularly in especially dangerous areas, so that their sound would be carried further and reverberate through the ship’s hull.
At the turn of the century, experiments to develop more effective fog-horns were carried out by John Tyndall and Lord Rayleigh, amongst others. Lord Rayleigh’s ongoing research for Trinity House culminated in a siren with a large trumpet designed to achieve maximum sound propagation.
As two Signalman owners can attest, to sleep in The Lizard youth hostel pre ‘98 when the fog-horns sound will result in a sleepless night. Now with the sophisticated electronic siren (100 dB with a range of 4 miles) all you can hear is a gentle peep.
Longstone Lighthouse and the tale of Grace Darling
“Is there in the whole field of history, or of fiction even, one instance of female heroism to compare for one moment with this?”  The Times 1838

Grace Darling was born in 1815 at Bamburgh on the Northumberland coast and spent her youth in Brownsman and Longstone lighthouses on the Staple Islands.  Her father, William, was the keeper. In the early hours of 7 September 1838, Grace, looking out from an upstairs window of the Longstone Lighthouse, spotted the wreck and survivors of the Forfarshire on Big Harcar, a low rocky outcrop approximately one mile away. The Forfarshire had foundered on the rocks and broken in half losing forty three lives.  The stern portion of the vessel had split off and was carried away in the storm. The forepart, to which clung the survivors, remained fast on the rocks. William Darling hesitated in carrying out a rescue as the storm was raging and the sea conditions were perilous. He was finally persuaded to make the attempt by his young daughter Grace, with her as the second hand in the small lighthouse coble. After a great struggle William and Grace managed to manoeuvre the coble near enough to the rock to enable William to leap across to the survivors. Grace now had to steady the coble on her own for some time, until her father could gather the weak survivors and attempt to transfer them into the boat. On the first trip they brought back four men and one woman and later a further four survivors were rescued.  The whole rescue took 2 hours. All nine had to be accommodated and fed at the lighthouse for two days until the storm abated and they could be taken to the mainland.  After the rescue news of Grace and her father’s heroism spread and they became national heroes. 
 

Longstone Lighthouse and the tale of Grace Darling

“Is there in the whole field of history, or of fiction even, one instance of female heroism to compare for one moment with this?”  The Times 1838
Grace Darling was born in 1815 at Bamburgh on the Northumberland coast and spent her youth in Brownsman and Longstone lighthouses on the Staple Islands.  Her father, William, was the keeper. In the early hours of 7 September 1838, Grace, looking out from an upstairs window of the Longstone Lighthouse, spotted the wreck and survivors of the Forfarshire on Big Harcar, a low rocky outcrop approximately one mile away. The Forfarshire had foundered on the rocks and broken in half losing forty three lives.  The stern portion of the vessel had split off and was carried away in the storm. The forepart, to which clung the survivors, remained fast on the rocks. William Darling hesitated in carrying out a rescue as the storm was raging and the sea conditions were perilous. He was finally persuaded to make the attempt by his young daughter Grace, with her as the second hand in the small lighthouse coble. After a great struggle William and Grace managed to manoeuvre the coble near enough to the rock to enable William to leap across to the survivors. Grace now had to steady the coble on her own for some time, until her father could gather the weak survivors and attempt to transfer them into the boat. On the first trip they brought back four men and one woman and later a further four survivors were rescued.  The whole rescue took 2 hours. All nine had to be accommodated and fed at the lighthouse for two days until the storm abated and they could be taken to the mainland.  After the rescue news of Grace and her father’s heroism spread and they became national heroes. 

 

CLARITY IS NOT LOST
Call me crazy but I like to be able to tell the time on my watch! As companies jostle for attention in the global market place many resort to cluttering the dial with all manner of exotic complications and designs, pushing the boundries of micro-mechanical wizardry and finding virtue in complexity. Is this why we insist on calling a wrist watch a time piece? Have modern time pieces lost their fundamental purpose of being? I believe information should be displayed with clarity and clarity in design is elegance. The Blacklamp Carbon is a wrist watch that tells the time…clearly.
BLACKLAMP SHOP 

CLARITY IS NOT LOST

Call me crazy but I like to be able to tell the time on my watch! As companies jostle for attention in the global market place many resort to cluttering the dial with all manner of exotic complications and designs, pushing the boundries of micro-mechanical wizardry and finding virtue in complexity. Is this why we insist on calling a wrist watch a time piece? Have modern time pieces lost their fundamental purpose of being? I believe information should be displayed with clarity and clarity in design is elegance. The Blacklamp Carbon is a wrist watch that tells the time…clearly.

BLACKLAMP SHOP 

BRITISH PATHE FILM
A beautiful British Pathe film from 1948 shows the three lighthouse keepers change shift and carry out chores at the Needles lighthouse, Solent, off the Isle of Wight. In this picture we can see one of the keepers making the evening meal on the lighthouses’ AGA range
 

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/needles-lighthouse

BRITISH PATHE FILM

A beautiful British Pathe film from 1948 shows the three lighthouse keepers change shift and carry out chores at the Needles lighthouse, Solent, off the Isle of Wight. In this picture we can see one of the keepers making the evening meal on the lighthouses’ AGA range
 
BLACKLAMP MAGIC
An amazing photo showing the GLTD ring that sits between the crystal and dial. In low level light conditions after the ring is charged, the tips of the hands and the polished rivet-head hour markers reflect the glow.

BLACKLAMP MAGIC

An amazing photo showing the GLTD ring that sits between the crystal and dial. In low level light conditions after the ring is charged, the tips of the hands and the polished rivet-head hour markers reflect the glow.

INSPIRATION AT EVERY TURN
even in retrospect! Here we have the generator from the Lizard lighthouse in Cornwall. The lighthouse was converted to electric power in 1924 and used these generators to rotate the lens assembly. In 1950 the generators were placed on standby when mains electricity was brought to the station that marks the most southerly point of Britain. On seeing this picture, sent in by a customer and friend of Schofield, we noticed how similar it is to the design on the cover of the Blacklamp instruction book - nice.

INSPIRATION AT EVERY TURN

even in retrospect! Here we have the generator from the Lizard lighthouse in Cornwall. The lighthouse was converted to electric power in 1924 and used these generators to rotate the lens assembly. In 1950 the generators were placed on standby when mains electricity was brought to the station that marks the most southerly point of Britain. On seeing this picture, sent in by a customer and friend of Schofield, we noticed how similar it is to the design on the cover of the Blacklamp instruction book - nice.

BLACKLAMP
Handmade in England each one of our Blacklamp Carbon cases is fabricated from a single unique billet of Morta. Removing the need for lightness in carbon fibre takes away the material’s inherent shortcomings for use in wrist watches. Morta is very dense and relatively heavy thereby improving by a large margin its surface hardness and toughness, thus making it the perfect material.The inspiration for naming our unique carbon composite comes from the ancient material Bog-oak or Bog-wood, also known as Morta. A rare form of timber, when brought out of the ground Bog-oak is in the early stages of fossilisation. The mineralisation makes the oak very hard and abrasive to work. The growth rings and medullary rays have been preserved and the timber has a very deep colour, almost black. These characteristics are not a million miles away from the carbon fibre composite used in the Blacklamp, a material that, after a solid year of R&D resulting in a ream of scientific documentation, we have trademarked as Morta.

http://schofieldwatchcompany.com/shop/schofield-blacklamp/

BLACKLAMP

Handmade in England each one of our Blacklamp Carbon cases is fabricated from a single unique billet of Morta. Removing the need for lightness in carbon fibre takes away the material’s inherent shortcomings for use in wrist watches. Morta is very dense and relatively heavy thereby improving by a large margin its surface hardness and toughness, thus making it the perfect material.
The inspiration for naming our unique carbon composite comes from the ancient material Bog-oak or Bog-wood, also known as Morta. A rare form of timber, when brought out of the ground Bog-oak is in the early stages of fossilisation. The mineralisation makes the oak very hard and abrasive to work. The growth rings and medullary rays have been preserved and the timber has a very deep colour, almost black. These characteristics are not a million miles away from the carbon fibre composite used in the Blacklamp, a material that, after a solid year of R&D resulting in a ream of scientific documentation, we have trademarked as Morta.

http://schofieldwatchcompany.com/shop/schofield-blacklamp/

NAB TOWER
“First the Nab and then the Warner,
Spit Sand Fort and Shithouse Corner”

My wife’s grandfather on her father’s side was stationed in Portsmouth for most of his naval days and was a true spirit of the sea. Long months were spent out to sea with the merchant navy returning home to Port and English shores for rest and to see loved ones. A traditional nautical rhyme spoken by her grandfather on returning to Portsmouth, followed the landmarks that signalled a return to their home port. First amongst this list of names is the ‘Nab’ or Nab Tower, an off-shore lighthouse marking the deep water channel on entrance to Portsmouth and Southampton harbours.

NAB TOWER

“First the Nab and then the Warner,
Spit Sand Fort and Shithouse Corner”
My wife’s grandfather on her father’s side was stationed in Portsmouth for most of his naval days and was a true spirit of the sea. Long months were spent out to sea with the merchant navy returning home to Port and English shores for rest and to see loved ones. A traditional nautical rhyme spoken by her grandfather on returning to Portsmouth, followed the landmarks that signalled a return to their home port. First amongst this list of names is the ‘Nab’ or Nab Tower, an off-shore lighthouse marking the deep water channel on entrance to Portsmouth and Southampton harbours.

Custard creams…

Cricket on the radio, the nexus of niche and The Blacklamp. Giles 2013 seminar at SalonQP describing the thought processes behind a very innovative wrist watch.

Movements…
…coming together. Plates being plated.

Movements…

…coming together. Plates being plated.

A stack of Ti buckles.
Default on the Blacklamp 
http://schofieldwatchcompany.com/product-category/accessories/

A stack of Ti buckles.

Default on the Blacklamp 

http://schofieldwatchcompany.com/product-category/accessories/

Brixham Breakwater
Following his defeat at the Battle of Waterloo, Napoleon was brought to Torbay on a ‘man o’ war’ en route to exile on St Helena in 1815. As he looked out over the sea and caught his first sight of Torbay he was heard to exclaim ‘Quel bon pays’! (What a lovely country!).
To the western side of Torbay lies Brixham, a small historic fishing port that has been inhabited since Saxon times, with evidence of trading and subsistence living stretching back to the ice age. In the Middle Ages, Brixham was the largest fishing port in the south west of England. Known as the ‘Mother of Deep-Sea Fisheries’, its boats helped to establish the fishing industries of Hull, Grimsby and Lowestoft.
Protecting the harbour today is the massive structure of Brixham Breakwater, stretching for half a mile into Torbay. The first stone in the Breakwater’s construction was laid in 1843 and the original structure stretched to 1400 feet in length. Over the years more structure was added until the Breakwater reached its full length in 1916. On top of this breakwater stands the 9 metre high cast-iron lighthouse.

Brixham Breakwater

Following his defeat at the Battle of Waterloo, Napoleon was brought to Torbay on a ‘man o’ war’ en route to exile on St Helena in 1815. As he looked out over the sea and caught his first sight of Torbay he was heard to exclaim ‘Quel bon pays’! (What a lovely country!).

To the western side of Torbay lies Brixham, a small historic fishing port that has been inhabited since Saxon times, with evidence of trading and subsistence living stretching back to the ice age. In the Middle Ages, Brixham was the largest fishing port in the south west of England. Known as the ‘Mother of Deep-Sea Fisheries’, its boats helped to establish the fishing industries of Hull, Grimsby and Lowestoft.

Protecting the harbour today is the massive structure of Brixham Breakwater, stretching for half a mile into Torbay. The first stone in the Breakwater’s construction was laid in 1843 and the original structure stretched to 1400 feet in length. Over the years more structure was added until the Breakwater reached its full length in 1916. On top of this breakwater stands the 9 metre high cast-iron lighthouse.

PHOTONS
What a great photo! The little Schofield EDC torch that comes with every Blacklamp.

PHOTONS

What a great photo! The little Schofield EDC torch that comes with every Blacklamp.

A1 FOR LEGIBILITY
Showing off the remarkable clarity of the Blacklamp dial. Elegance in simplicity.
The Blacklamp

A1 FOR LEGIBILITY

Showing off the remarkable clarity of the Blacklamp dial. Elegance in simplicity.

The Blacklamp

INSTRUCTIONS
Artwork that matches the case back engraving. Showing the chosen lighthouse, its coordinates and the character of flash. The light of Gorleston Range Rear has a white occulting flash every 4 seconds. Standing 11 meters above sea level with a range of 10 nautical miles.

INSTRUCTIONS

Artwork that matches the case back engraving. Showing the chosen lighthouse, its coordinates and the character of flash. The light of Gorleston Range Rear has a white occulting flash every 4 seconds. Standing 11 meters above sea level with a range of 10 nautical miles.

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